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Department of Anthropology

Dr.Loring at weather station

Certain as clock-work, every afternoon about four, a gang of ravens would fly down out of the mountains and wreck havoc on the murre colony next to the site. After eating their fill of eggs and chicks each and every raven would fly back to their roost in the mountains with one blue egg speared to their beak
"Certain as clock-work, every afternoon about four, a gang of ravens would fly down out of the mountains and wreck havoc on the murre colony next to the site. After eating their fill of eggs and chicks each and every raven would fly back to their roost in the mountains with one blue egg speared to their beak."


Stephen Loring


Museum Anthropologist and Arctic Archaeologist

 

Division: Arctic Studies Program

Area of Specialization:
Museum anthropology pertaining to hunter-gatherer adaptations and Arctic and subarctic archaeology and ethnohistory

Phone:
202-633-1902
Fax: 202-357-2684
E-mail: lorings@si.edu




Department of Anthropology Mailing Address



Education:

PhD  Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, 1992.
MA   Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, 1981.
BA   Anthropology Major, Goddard College, 1973.

Professional Activities:

North American senior representative, World Archaeological Congress (2008) 

Research Interests/Profile:

Museum anthropology especially as it pertains to hunter-gatherer adaptations, arctic and subarctic archaeology and ethnohistory. Indigenous peoples of Labrador, Arctic Canada, Beringia and the Aleutian Islands.  Archaeology of the eastern United States.  Public policy in the circumpolar north. Repatriation.  History of Arctic anthropology.

Picture showing Murre eggs opened by ravens, Agattu, July 1995.
Picture showing Murre eggs opened by ravens, Agattu,
July 1995.

Loring helps Curate and facilitates access to Smithsonian's archaeological, ethnohistorical and archival collections pertaining to the indigenous peoples from the North American Arctic and sub-Arctic regions. 

Visit the Arctic Studies Center program online to read about the latest research and information about a wide range of research, education, outreach, and publication programs dealing with northern cultures and environments, past and present.

Selected Publications:

Loring, S. 2008. The Wind Blows Everything Off the Ground: New Provisions and New Directions in Archaeological Research in the North.  In, Opening Archaeology: Repatriation’s Impact on Contemporary Research and Practice, edited by Thomas Killion. Santa Fe: School  for Advanced Research: Santa Fe. Pp. 181-194.

Loring, S. and A. Speiss 2007. “Further documentation supporting the former existence of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in northern Quebec-Labrador.” Arctic 60(1):7-16.

Loring, S. and L. Rosenmeier 2005. Anguti’s Amulet/Angutiup ânguanga. Eastern Woodland Publishing, Millbrook First Nation: Truro, Nova Scotia.

Loring, S., Moira T. McCaffrey, Peter Armitage and Daniel Ashini 2003. “The archaeology and ethnohistory of a drowned land: Innu Nation research along the former Michikamats lake shore in Nitassinan (interior Labrador)." Archaeology of Eastern North America 31:45-72.

Loring, S. 2002 (co-edited with William Fitzhugh and Daniel Odess). Honoring Our Elders: A History of Eastern Arctic Archaeology.  Contributions to Circumpolar Anthropology, volume 2. Arctic Studies Center,  Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Fitzhugh, W., Stephen Loring and Daniel Odess, eds., 2002. "’And they took away the stones from Ramah’: lithic raw material sourcing and Eastern Arctic archaeology”. In, Honoring Our Elders: A History of Eastern Arctic Archaeology, Contributions to Circumpolar Anthropology, volume 2. Arctic Studies Center,  Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., pp. 163-185.

Loring, S. 2001. “Repatriation and community anthropology: the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center.” In, The Future of the Past: Archaeologists, Native Americans, and Repatriation, edited by Tamara Bray, pp. 185-200. Garland: New York.

Loring, S. and Melanie Cabak 2000. “‘A set of very fair cups and saucers’: stamped ceramics as an example of  Inuit incorporation.” International Journal of  Historical Archaeology 4(1):34-52.

Loring, S. 1998. In Torngak’s realm: the 19th-century photography of Moravian missionaries in Labrador. In, Imaging the Arctic, edited by Jonathan King and Henrietta Lidchi. British Museum Press: London, pp.207-220.

Loring, S. 1998. Stubborn independence: an essay on the Innu and archaeology. In, Bringing Back the Past: Historical Perspectives on Canadian Archaeology, edited by Pamela Jane Smith and Donald Mitchell, pp.259-276. Mercury Series, Archaeological Survey of Canada, Paper 158. Canadian Museum of Civilization: Hull, Quebec.

Loring, S. 1997. On the trail to the Caribou House: some reflections on Innu caribou hunters in Ntessinan (Labrador). In, Caribou and Reindeer Hunters of the Northern Hemisphere, edited by Lawrence Jackson and Paul Thacker, pp.185-220. Avebury  Press: London.

Loring, S. 1985. Boundary maintenance, mortuary ceremonialism and resource  control in the Early Woodland: three cemetery sites in  Vermont. Archaeology of Eastern North America 13:93-127.

Loring, S. 1980. Paleoindian hunters and the Champlain Sea: a presumed association. Man in the Northeast 19:15-41.

    

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