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La Venta Monument 47

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Record Count: (576 - 600 out of 624)

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San Lorenzo Tenochtitlán, Veracruz

Potrero Nuevo Monument 2. This monument was exavated during Matthew Stirling’s last archaeological expedition in 1946 at Potrero Nuevo, one of the three sites that collectively are referred to as San Lorenzo Tenochtitlán. The monument represents a rectangular throne or altar supported by two identical chubby Atlantean figures.

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La Venta, Tabasco

La Venta Monument 36b. This large piece of greenish schist is 162 cm long, 87 cm wide and 49 cm thick. There are 25 axe sharpening grooves on it. Written on slide “Feb 68P5”

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La Venta, Tabasco

La Venta Monument 36a. This large boulder of greenish schist measures 163 cm by 77 cm by 49 cm. There are 21 axe sharpening grooves on it. It appears that Monument 36a and 36b were one piece at one time. They were found about 5.3 meters from each other. Written on slide “Feb 68P5”

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La Venta, Tabasco

La Venta Offering No. 2.

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La Venta, Tabasco

Visible in the background is La Venta Monument 7 (the basalt column tomb, or Feature A-2-a). Written on slide “49”

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La Venta, Tabasco

Detail of the jaguar mask mosaic, Southwest Platform. Written on slide “108”

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La Venta, Tabasco

The tools to move the heavy monument around consisted primarily of wooden poles and rope.

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La Venta, Tabasco

The tools to move the heavy monument around consisted primarily of wooden poles and rope.

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La Venta, Tabasco

La Venta Monument 19. Eduardo Contreras sketching the low relief carving of Monument No. 19 during the 1968 expedition. Written on slide “127E”

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La Venta, Tabasco

La Venta Offering No. 4. Eduardo Contreras is kneeling in front of the offering and reaching in to remove the figurines and celts.

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La Venta, Tabasco

Jaguar mask mosaic, Southwest Platform, with Eduardo Contreras.

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La Venta, Tabasco

In the background is a pile of rough paving stones, from the lower layers of the Southwest Platform.

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La Venta, Tabasco

Overview of part of the site of La Venta. To the left are the basalt columns of the Court visible.

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La Venta, Tabasco

Visible in the background are the basalt columns of the ceremonial court. Written on slide “65C”

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La Venta, Tabasco

Work in progress at the Southwest Platform.

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La Venta, Tabasco

Rough paving stones from the lower levels of the Southwest Platform.

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La Venta, Tabasco

La Venta Offering No. 4.

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La Venta, Tabasco

Work in progress.

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La Venta, Tabasco

Large pile of rough paving stones from the lower levels of the Southwest Platform.

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La Venta, Tabasco

Transporting the basalt columns from the Court. Eduardo Contreras standing at the right in the foreground.

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La Venta, Tabasco

Transporting the basalt columns from the Court. On the left, watching the men, is Stephen Heizer.

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La Venta, Tabasco

La Venta Monument 20. The style of this monument and its ornamentation is unusual for La Venta, and Drucker, Heizer and Squier believed it might have been brought to the site already carved (p. 200)

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La Venta, Tabasco

Eduardo Contreras removing the firgurines and celts from La Venta Offering No. 4.

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La Venta, Tabasco

La Venta Monument 7, also referred to as the tomb of basalt columns, or Feature A-2-a. Written on slide “136A”

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Tres Zapotes, Veracruz

Caption from the Wetmore album: “View [from the Río Papaloapan] of the water front at Alvarado, Veracruz. March 5, 1939.”


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